Push Jerk. Mile Run. PUC Day 7.

Decent sleep last night, but only about 5 hours, and it was interrupted.  Better than the night before!  One block breakfast & coffee, then

Warm Up

Football-style agility drills, followed by 1 round of Push-ups, Sit-ups, Pull-ups, Squats, 12 reps each, then shoulder openers, hip mobility stretches. Then

WOD: Push Jerk and One Mile Run

CrossFit Asheville’s WOD today is: Find your 5 rep max for the Push Jerk and then do a one mile time trial.

Push Jerk

Push-Jerk:
5 x 15 kg
5 x 20 kg
5 x 20 kg + 20 lbs
5 x 20 kg + 40 lbs
5 x 20 kg + 50 lbs
5 x 20 kg + 60 lbs
5 x 20 kg + 70 lbs
5 x 20 kg + 75 lbs. 5 rep max: 119 lbs. A “PR” for today, but given my shoulder press PR for 1 rep (120 lbs), probably not the best I could do.

One Mile Time Trial

My time: 6:53.

For a google map of the route, see here.

Dead Hang Pull-Up Challenge Day 7

Rep #1: at the 6:00 am workout, before the official pull-ups (front grip)

Reps #2-3: at the 6:00 am workout, after the Push Jerks, before the run (reverse grip)

Rep #4: at the YMCA, about 7:20 am, on the smith machine, with knees to chest (front grip)

Reps #5-6: at home, about 12:30 pm, 2 consecutive reps (front grip)

Rep #7: at home, about 1:30 pm (front grip)

Thrusters and other Olympic Lifts

So far I remain at novice level in Cross-Fit inspired workouts. But today I did some stuff that made me feel tough, and made me think about the virtues of Olympic Lifting.

The Olympic bar is used in regular gyms primarily on bench press set ups or, increasingly, in highly controlled smith-squat machines, where the bar is really a part of the machine. In other words, your standard gym doesn’t actually let you use the Olympic Bar as it is designed to be used: for “Olympic lifting.”

So far, by being in cross fit, I have trained with the free-floating 45# and 35# Olympic bar plus weights on the following exercises: deadlifts, front squats, hang power cleans, and thrusters (a combination of front squat and push-press). Today we did “thrusters.”

Thrusters can be totally outrageous or more controlled and even aerobic.

What I can’t believe, looking back on my morning, was that I was taking a 90# weight and pulling it off the ground, bringing it to my shoulders, front-squatting with it, and then “thrusting” it overhead.

Ninety pounds is a lot of weight man.

The virtue of so-called “Olympic” lifting is that it is about full range of motion and full body exercise. Every Olympic weight lifting movement combines major muscle groups from front and back, top and bottom, and involves the stabilizers and small muscles throughout the system. The result of training in these movements is “functional fitness” and a feeling of real body confidence. Not to mention you can get big.